SEN Teachers

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Government figures reveal rise in SEND pupil numbers

Government figures reveal rise in SEND pupil numbers

The proportion of pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) increased in the last year, according to the latest government statistics. It marks a third straight year that numbers have risen and pupils with SEND now account for 14.9% of the total school pupil population, as of January 2019 – some 1,318,000 pupils. That marks an increase from 14.6% in January 2018, and 14.4% the year previously, although it should be noted that the number of pupils with SEND declined drastically from 1,704,980 in 2010 to 1,228,785 in 2016. Ministers have said the latest increase is driven by rises in the number of pupils with Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans and in those receiving SEND support. According to the figures from January, 271,000 pupils in the UK had an EHC plan, while 1,047,200 were receiving SEND assistance. The most common needs regarding the latter related to speech, language and communication, as 22% of pupils required such support. Autism Spectrum Disorder was the most prevalent type of special educational need among those with an EHC plan, accounting for 29% of pupils – a marginal increase of 1% from January 2018. The latest figures also reveal that the number of pupils with SEND being educated in state-funded secondary schools has continually declined since 2011. Some 34.2% of pupils with SEND were in state secondary schools, down from 43.6% in 2011, while the proportion of those being taught in private schools has jumped to 7.1%, up from 4% in the same period. Meanwhile, at primary level, 56.9% of pupils are taught in state-funded schools. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Expert panel to drive teacher wellbeing support changes

Education experts, school leaders and union representatives are among a 26-strong panel tasked with enhancing teacher mental health and wellbeing. Led by mental health charity Mind chief executive Paul Farmer, the group of experts has met for the first time to discuss how classroom pressures can be reduced. After gathering evidence from teachers and school leaders, the panel is due to provide a set of recommendations for the Department for Education. While a date is yet to be finalised for when that will occur, a spokesperson suggested that it will be in early 2020. Education secretary Damian Hinds announced plans for the advisory panel in March this year, while schools minister Nick Gibb – who was present at the first meeting – said it will have a “crucial role to play”. Among those at the first meeting were Sinead McBrearty, chief executive of the charity Education Support Partnership, Leora Cruddas, chief executive of the Confederation of School Trusts and Emma Knights, chief executive of the National Governance Association. Others included Tom Bennett, founder of ResearchED and a government advisor on behaviour, and the assistant general secretary of the National Education Union Nansi Ellis. The National Association of Head Teachers’ director of policy, James Bowen and the deputy director of policy at the Association of School and College Leaders, Sara Ford, were also both present on the panel. Also attending the initial discussion were Bill Watkin, chief executive of the Sixth Form College Association, Faye Craster, director of teacher development at Teach First and the Chartered College of Teaching’s head of online learning and community Hannah Tyreman. A number of head teachers, college directors and university staff completed the panel. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Government launches £12m tender for early career framework training

Five education providers are to split £12 million to support new teachers with training and development as part of the government’s early career framework. A tender has gone out to find suitable providers that can give teachers enhanced support as they prepare for life in the classroom. The move is part of the government’s recruitment and retention strategy, first unveiled in January, and is set to transform teacher training processes. Around £130 million has so far been pledged to the early career framework, which focuses on training programmes, mentoring, and creating free training resources. It also enables schools to reduce the timetabled hours for new teaching staff, giving them more time for training and development as a result. The tender, launched by the Department for Education, is open to local authorities, schools and education institutions that aid the development of training materials in four key areas. According to Schools Week, £12 million is available to be split between successful applicants and that could be divided among five contracts, depending on the quality of applications submitted. A document from the Department for Education notes that although sending out the invitation to tender in the summer months is not ideal in terms of giving schools time to prepare, it is necessary to ensure a role out of the framework from September 2020. Ministers are keen for the early roll-out of the framework to reach at least 2,500 early career teachers, along with their mentors. Any teacher training provider taking part will need to support a minimum of 200 early career teachers and 200 mentors. Education secretary Damian Hinds described launching the tender as “an important milestone” and said that providing more support for newly qualified teachers is central to the recruitment and retention strategy. “The early stages of a teacher’s career are an incredibly exciting time – but they can also be very challenging, which is why it’s so important to make sure they are properly supported,” he added. The deadline for bids for the tender is in early August, with those that are successful set to be notified in the autumn. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Why schools need to embrace flexible working for teachers

Schools need to find ways of providing greater flexible working opportunities to middle and senior staff, new figures suggest. Research from the National Foundation for Educational Research shows that one in six secondary school teachers has voiced a desire to work fewer hours in order to have a better work-life balance. This requires “a more proactive and positive approach to offering part-time and flexible opportunities” according to NFER chief executive Carole Willis, as it enables schools to retain experienced staff. The NFER has suggested that rigid school timetables and the need for teachers to be in school for lesson planning limit the ability for flexible working. Around one-fifth of full-time secondary school staff move into part-time roles when they leave the profession, highlighting their desire for flexible approaches to working life. The report, titled Part-time Teaching and Flexible Working in Secondary Schools, also found that one-third of teachers who want to work reduced hours had put off a request as they believed it would not be approved. One in 12 teachers told the study they would like to cut their hours by more than one working day a week, while education secretary Damian Hinds has spoken of the need for the sector to have more flexible approaches. When compared to other industries, education has far fewer options for flexibility, and the minister has said the sector simply “can’t afford” for that to continue. However, teacher recruitment is required in order to provide more flexible opportunities for existing staff. Figures from Teacher Tap suggest that 40,000 new teachers would be needed to cover the shortfall if 40% of current teachers who desire flexible working were to cut their hours by just one day a week. One in ten teachers also voiced concerns in the study around whether working part-time would impact their long-term career progression. The general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, Geoff Barton, added that offering part-time and flexible working is vital to boosting teacher retention. Supply work can help in giving teachers the flexibility that they desire, with them being in control of the days that they work and suit for them. Sign up with us today to get your career as a supply teacher started! Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

EHC plans for SEND pupils surges by 11%

Councils across England have recorded an 11% annual jump in the number of education, health and care (EHC) plans issued to pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). The rise is part of a wider trend that has seen demand for care plans surge in the past four years, with schools fighting to ensure they maintain educational standards. According to new government figures, 354,000 children and young people were receiving EHC plans from local authorities in January this year, up from just under 320,000 a year ago. While pupil numbers have increased during that time, the number of plans being issued has grown steadily since their introduction as a replacement for statements of special educational needs. EHC plans have a major role in determining how much funding schools receive per pupil, a key factor when they are facing financial pressures. The key figures Some 39.2 of pupils with EHC plans are educated in mainstream schools, with a further 38.6% of those with plans taught in special schools. A further 16.2% are in further education and 0.8% of pupils are in alternative provision. In 2018, 48,900 children and young people were issued with a new EHC plan, up 16% from the year before, while pupils waited longer to receive their plans. In total, 60.4% of pupils saw their new EHC plans issues within 20 weeks in 2018 – while this represents a drop from the 64.8% figure for 2017, it remains above the two years before that. Dealing with demand The Local Government Association has previously warned that schools could face a SEND funding gap as a result of the sharp rise in demand for EHC plans. Should funding for those with great needs not keep pace with the demand, schools could be forced to cut the number of SEND places they can offer. Currently, the first £6,000 of high needs provision is funded by schools, meaning those under financial pressures may need to restructure their educational offering. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Interview techniques for teachers

If you’re on the hunt for a new teaching role, knowing what to expect in an interview can make all the difference. Whether you want to look for a new role within your current school, are pursuing a role elsewhere, or are a newly qualified teacher looking to embark on your career, here’s what you may want to consider. Pre-interview preparation Preparation is key when it comes to teaching interviews and interviewers will be able to spot when you’ve put the effort in. Do your research ahead of the interview and seek out all the information you can about the school, its history, ethos, policies and the like. Understand the approaches that are taken to safeguarding, behaviour management and assessments for learning, and refer to them when answering questions during the interview itself. Plan your journey to the school and give yourself enough time to make the journey comfortably and without rushing. Being on time is vital! What to wear to an interview First impressions can make all the difference and it starts with your attire. Dress smartly, be friendly and have a smile on your face – these factors may seem simplistic, but they don’t go unnoticed. What to take with you Make sure you have all the necessary documentation so you can go equipped with it all to the interview too. Have a copy of your DBS certificate and have ID handy, as well as any other papers that have been requested. During the interview Be prepared for tough questions and prepare answers, and parts of answers, in advance. If you can, discuss them with a friend or family member as you may find that you can expand on parts of your answers or add in lines on certain experiences. Be sure to relate your answers to the teaching role and the school you are applying for. The interview/demo lesson As a fantastic opportunity to showcase your skills in action, engagement can be key to getting to know a new set of pupils quickly. Include lots of question and answer sessions in the lesson and don’t be afraid to do something different if it engages the class. You should have several copies of your lesson plan to hand too, as interviewers can see what you are planning to do. If the demo lesson is cut short for any reason, at least your intentions can be seen. Questions to prepare for Why did you apply for this particular role? You should talk about the key aspects of the role and what specifically attracted you to it, as well as wider points related to what attracted you into teaching. Your answer will be unique to you and it will provide plenty of insight into why you have made the choices you have. You can also show passion for teaching and link in your career aspirations if you’re an NQT.   Why did you choose to teach this particular age range? Again, this answer will be unique to you and is an opportunity for you to detail why you prefer to work with specific year groups, or why you differentiate between primary and secondary school teaching. You may want to talk about the rewarding nature of the work and the ability to deliver various different outcomes.   Why do you want to work at our school? Showcase your research and highlight what makes the particular school standout from others – be it achievements, its ethos or other factors. Know key information around results, the school’s reputation, its catchment area and anything else you think is relevant.   How would you work with a teaching assistant in your classroom? Discuss how you can work with others and highlight the need for collaborative working in the classroom. Show how you would integrate a teaching assistant into your lesson plans and to what degree you would rely on them for assistance. This will vary by teacher and by the lessons being delivered, so you should showcase flexible approaches to teaching where possible.   How will you manage challenges at work? Teaching brings with it numerous challenges and the interviewer will want to see that you recognise that. Refer to instances from your time in teacher training or during your NQT year and detail how you overcome them. Did you struggle to balance lesson planning with a full teaching caseload? If so, talk about it. Or if you’ve had additional responsibilities in past roles that required more time than anticipated, discuss how you found a solution.   What are the core skills and qualities that pupils look for in teachers? This question should enable you to showcase your teaching style and to explain how you feel it fits in a classroom environment. Recognise that different styles exist and showcase the positive aspects – including your drive, passion for teaching, patience, sense of humour and ability to communicate – that are associated with your particular way of doing things.   What qualities do you have which would make you an effective teacher? Take this opportunity to assess the role you are applying for and to relate your skills to the key requirements of the role. Aspects such as patience and flexibility could be considered, alongside how a role can be rewarding. Think about the means of creating and delivering lesson plans and of the need to adapt to different situations as they arise.   Describe a good lesson Look to mention the importance of preparation and refer back to successful lessons you have taught in the past. What worked well and what didn’t, and discuss how the experience enabled you to shape your teaching style as a result. This is a chance to show that you analyse your lessons on a regular basis and that you can pick out strengths and weaknesses to work on and develop.   Describe the teaching method you find most effective Showcase the need for flexibility and that different teaching styles can be required in different situations. Although you will likely have a predominant style that you prefer, it’s an opportunity to highlight how you can use various approaches as you see fit. You may also want to discuss why you feel some methods are more effective than others in those situations.   How would you deal with a pupil who is not co-operating? This is an opportunity to discuss behaviour management strategies and to talk about what works for you in detail. Refer to previous experiences and talk about situations where you were able to bring a difficult, or potentially difficult, situation under control. It’s likely you’ll have plenty of examples, so you can showcase how your approaches have the desired results.   Show examples of how you have achieved each of the Teaching Standards Highlight your knowledge of the Teaching Standards and remember that they represent the bare minimum of what is expected. Look to showcase examples where you excel and approach each standard individually when answering. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Marking Child Safety Week in your classroom

Child safety is a huge part of school and everyday life, which is why Child Safety Week seeks to put an emphasis on being careful in all everyday environments. Run by the Child Accident Prevention Trust, the theme for 2019 is ‘Family life today: where’s the risk?’, which aims to help children to identify risk around them. Taking place from 3-9 June 2019, there is a focus on teaching youngsters about the potential dangers that exist when they’re at home, or out and about, in the hope that raising awareness will help to reduce the number of accidents that occur. Teachers have a pivotal role to play in raising awareness of everyday risks and there an array of activities that can promote safety in a fun and engaging way. Identifying risks Given the nature of modern family life, there is an abundance of risks that many people, both young and old, may not even consider. For instance, button batteries can be easily swallowed and washing capsules can also be deadly if they end up in the wrong hands. It’s also important to identify and recognise risks when outdoors, such as by being distracted when using a mobile device near busy roads. Child Safety Week, therefore, provides an opportunity to debate the importance of safety and for teachers to discuss the risks that pupils may face. What to think about Pupils should be asked for their perceptions of risk too, as they may not necessarily think that something is a danger when it could be. Perhaps pupils could be quizzed on the risks that they face when making the journey to school, or there is an abundance of fun online tools that youngsters can use to spot everyday dangers. A wide range of resources is also available on the Child Accident Prevention Trust’s website to support teachers and parents ahead of Child Safety Week. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Learning at Work Week: Putting L&D at the forefront of teaching

Learning and development are viewed as an essential part of teaching and it forms one of the foundations of Learning at Work Week. The annual event puts an emphasis on learning cultures in the workplace and focuses on how staff at all levels of organisations can work to better themselves. Celebrated from 13th -19th May this year, the theme for Learning at Work Week 2019 is ‘Shaping the Future’ – asking staff to ensure that they have the necessary tools in place so that continual learning and development is possible. Coordinated by the Campaign for Learning, the week also wants to explore how individuals can be more open and resilient to change. This is especially important for teachers and other support staff at a time when the education system is experiencing reform, financial pressures and greater demand as a result of rising pupil numbers. The week provides a great opportunity for head teachers and school boards to promote organisational change and pathways for learning, as well as a range of other benefits. By embracing the topics related to Learning at Work Week, school staff may be able to alter their culture for better outcomes – some of which may include the following:Changing attitudes to learning and workIncreasing awareness of learning and development opportunitiesDevelop learning opportunities in line with wider school goalsEnhanced feedback to support further learning and developmentOpenings to spot and reorganise internal talentValuing different methods and ways of workingIncreasing knowledge and awareness of teacher support toolsTackling departmental or year-group silo working to promote collaboration Campaign for Learning has outlined a number of activities that relate to three key strands – ‘future open’, ‘future ready’ and ‘future active’, details of which can be found here. They have also published a set of ideas and tips for creating an effective Learning at Work event, which includes many of the key topics that should be considered and discussed. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly. 

New expert group to focus on teacher wellbeing

Education secretary Damian Hinds has unveiled proposals for an expert advisory group that will help the government to find new ways to support teacher wellbeing. Making the announcement at the Association of School and College Leaders’ (ASCL) annual conference in Birmingham, Mr Hinds said that the wellbeing of teachers cannot be taken for granted. The new advisory group will focus on how better wellbeing for teachers can be promoted and draws on expertise from head teachers, teaching unions, professional bodies and Mind, the mental health charity. It forms part of plans to improve the culture in schools by improving the day-to-day experiences of teachers by addressing their workload concerns, tackling poor behaviour and by simplifying the accountability system. Mr Hinds said there is a need for society to enhance its understanding of mental health and wellbeing, including that of teachers as well as pupils. “Teaching requires high levels of selflessness as teachers always put the good of their pupils first,” he explained. “I’m clear that your [teacher] wellbeing is also something we need to prioritise.” Mr Hinds explained that the advisory group “will provide expert advice” while focusing on how the government and school leaders can promote wellbeing to those in primary and secondary school teaching jobs. “Happy motivated, well supported teachers are more likely to have happy and motivated pupils in their classrooms, and that, ladies and gentlemen, is why we’re all here,” he told those at the conference. The advisory group is set to discuss concerns with head teachers and school leaders before making recommendations to the Department for Education on the best approaches to take. ASCL general secretary Geoff Barton has welcomed the proposals and said the union is looking forward to finding out what recommendations are produced. Meanwhile, Paul Farmer, chief executive of Mind, said the key steps are to “start a conversation about mental health that empowers teachers” and to provide the right training and guidance so that teachers can support themselves. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobsExam Invigilator jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant 

9 Posts found