Primary Teacher

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Expert panel to drive teacher wellbeing support changes

Education experts, school leaders and union representatives are among a 26-strong panel tasked with enhancing teacher mental health and wellbeing. Led by mental health charity Mind chief executive Paul Farmer, the group of experts has met for the first time to discuss how classroom pressures can be reduced. After gathering evidence from teachers and school leaders, the panel is due to provide a set of recommendations for the Department for Education. While a date is yet to be finalised for when that will occur, a spokesperson suggested that it will be in early 2020. Education secretary Damian Hinds announced plans for the advisory panel in March this year, while schools minister Nick Gibb – who was present at the first meeting – said it will have a “crucial role to play”. Among those at the first meeting were Sinead McBrearty, chief executive of the charity Education Support Partnership, Leora Cruddas, chief executive of the Confederation of School Trusts and Emma Knights, chief executive of the National Governance Association. Others included Tom Bennett, founder of ResearchED and a government advisor on behaviour, and the assistant general secretary of the National Education Union Nansi Ellis. The National Association of Head Teachers’ director of policy, James Bowen and the deputy director of policy at the Association of School and College Leaders, Sara Ford, were also both present on the panel. Also attending the initial discussion were Bill Watkin, chief executive of the Sixth Form College Association, Faye Craster, director of teacher development at Teach First and the Chartered College of Teaching’s head of online learning and community Hannah Tyreman. A number of head teachers, college directors and university staff completed the panel. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Government launches £12m tender for early career framework training

Five education providers are to split £12 million to support new teachers with training and development as part of the government’s early career framework. A tender has gone out to find suitable providers that can give teachers enhanced support as they prepare for life in the classroom. The move is part of the government’s recruitment and retention strategy, first unveiled in January, and is set to transform teacher training processes. Around £130 million has so far been pledged to the early career framework, which focuses on training programmes, mentoring, and creating free training resources. It also enables schools to reduce the timetabled hours for new teaching staff, giving them more time for training and development as a result. The tender, launched by the Department for Education, is open to local authorities, schools and education institutions that aid the development of training materials in four key areas. According to Schools Week, £12 million is available to be split between successful applicants and that could be divided among five contracts, depending on the quality of applications submitted. A document from the Department for Education notes that although sending out the invitation to tender in the summer months is not ideal in terms of giving schools time to prepare, it is necessary to ensure a role out of the framework from September 2020. Ministers are keen for the early roll-out of the framework to reach at least 2,500 early career teachers, along with their mentors. Any teacher training provider taking part will need to support a minimum of 200 early career teachers and 200 mentors. Education secretary Damian Hinds described launching the tender as “an important milestone” and said that providing more support for newly qualified teachers is central to the recruitment and retention strategy. “The early stages of a teacher’s career are an incredibly exciting time – but they can also be very challenging, which is why it’s so important to make sure they are properly supported,” he added. The deadline for bids for the tender is in early August, with those that are successful set to be notified in the autumn. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Why schools need to embrace flexible working for teachers

Schools need to find ways of providing greater flexible working opportunities to middle and senior staff, new figures suggest. Research from the National Foundation for Educational Research shows that one in six secondary school teachers has voiced a desire to work fewer hours in order to have a better work-life balance. This requires “a more proactive and positive approach to offering part-time and flexible opportunities” according to NFER chief executive Carole Willis, as it enables schools to retain experienced staff. The NFER has suggested that rigid school timetables and the need for teachers to be in school for lesson planning limit the ability for flexible working. Around one-fifth of full-time secondary school staff move into part-time roles when they leave the profession, highlighting their desire for flexible approaches to working life. The report, titled Part-time Teaching and Flexible Working in Secondary Schools, also found that one-third of teachers who want to work reduced hours had put off a request as they believed it would not be approved. One in 12 teachers told the study they would like to cut their hours by more than one working day a week, while education secretary Damian Hinds has spoken of the need for the sector to have more flexible approaches. When compared to other industries, education has far fewer options for flexibility, and the minister has said the sector simply “can’t afford” for that to continue. However, teacher recruitment is required in order to provide more flexible opportunities for existing staff. Figures from Teacher Tap suggest that 40,000 new teachers would be needed to cover the shortfall if 40% of current teachers who desire flexible working were to cut their hours by just one day a week. One in ten teachers also voiced concerns in the study around whether working part-time would impact their long-term career progression. The general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, Geoff Barton, added that offering part-time and flexible working is vital to boosting teacher retention. Supply work can help in giving teachers the flexibility that they desire, with them being in control of the days that they work and suit for them. Sign up with us today to get your career as a supply teacher started! Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Government reveals Key Stage 1 SATs scaled scores

The government has revealed the ‘expected’ scores for pupils who have completed their Key Stage 1 SATS. The scaled scores replaced the previous ‘levels’ system in 2016 and pupils need to achieve at least 100 in their scaled scores to meet government expectations. However, the scores vary for the maths, reading and punctuation, spelling and grammar papers and are assessed year on year. The most notable change was on the maths paper, where pupils required 34 from a possible 60 marks to reach the government expected target (a scaled score of 100). This marked a drop from 36 last year, and from 37 the year before, although marks for the reading and punctuation, spelling and grammar were unchanged from a year ago. In order to reach the expected level, pupils needed to score 25 of 40 marks in reading, a requirement that has not changed since it was increased from 22 marks in 2017. A score of 24 of 40 was needed in the grammar, punctuation and spelling paper, another score that has remained unchanged since 2017. The scaled scores go 15 above and below 100, with a score between 100 and 115 highlighting that a pupil has reached the expected standard. A raw score of at least three is required to get the lowest scaled score of 85. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Celebrating World Music Day in the classroom

As a celebration of music in all its forms, World Music Day offers an opportunity to embrace the power of sound in the classroom for both primary teachers and secondary teachers. Be that in music lessons or when looking at any other subject, the day aims to raise the profile of music and to appreciate the impact it can have on health, wellbeing and a range of other factors. Falling on 21 June each year, World Music Day represents a fantastic opportunity for primary and secondary teachers to encourage pupils to pick up a new instrument or to return to one they once played. From listening to music, studying its many forms or discovering something new, the day encourages anyone to take part. The background Launched as the Fete de la Musique in France back in 1982, World Music Day is now marked in 120 countries and more than 1,000 cities across the world. A number of famous faces act as ambassadors for Music Day in the UK, including Big Issue founder Lord Bird MBE, Pink Floyd’s bass player Guy Pratt, TV presenter Jon Snow and Welsh soprano Elin Manahan Thomas. What can teachers do in the classroom for World Music Day? Music can act as a soothing influence in the run-up to exams and can be used to help pupils to memorise key information too. Introducing these techniques may benefit pupils in the long term, as it can help reduce anxiety and stress, while also exposing them to a number of fun and engaging musical genres. The day could also be used to encourage children to discuss their favourite types of music and to consider why they prefer certain types over others. Look to introduce music into the classroom for World Music Day and see if it impacts on engagement and whether pupils are more enthusiastic to learn – if they are, it could be time to make music a bigger part of teaching plans! Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Interview techniques for teachers

If you’re on the hunt for a new teaching role, knowing what to expect in an interview can make all the difference. Whether you want to look for a new role within your current school, are pursuing a role elsewhere, or are a newly qualified teacher looking to embark on your career, here’s what you may want to consider. Pre-interview preparation Preparation is key when it comes to teaching interviews and interviewers will be able to spot when you’ve put the effort in. Do your research ahead of the interview and seek out all the information you can about the school, its history, ethos, policies and the like. Understand the approaches that are taken to safeguarding, behaviour management and assessments for learning, and refer to them when answering questions during the interview itself. Plan your journey to the school and give yourself enough time to make the journey comfortably and without rushing. Being on time is vital! What to wear to an interview First impressions can make all the difference and it starts with your attire. Dress smartly, be friendly and have a smile on your face – these factors may seem simplistic, but they don’t go unnoticed. What to take with you Make sure you have all the necessary documentation so you can go equipped with it all to the interview too. Have a copy of your DBS certificate and have ID handy, as well as any other papers that have been requested. During the interview Be prepared for tough questions and prepare answers, and parts of answers, in advance. If you can, discuss them with a friend or family member as you may find that you can expand on parts of your answers or add in lines on certain experiences. Be sure to relate your answers to the teaching role and the school you are applying for. The interview/demo lesson As a fantastic opportunity to showcase your skills in action, engagement can be key to getting to know a new set of pupils quickly. Include lots of question and answer sessions in the lesson and don’t be afraid to do something different if it engages the class. You should have several copies of your lesson plan to hand too, as interviewers can see what you are planning to do. If the demo lesson is cut short for any reason, at least your intentions can be seen. Questions to prepare for Why did you apply for this particular role? You should talk about the key aspects of the role and what specifically attracted you to it, as well as wider points related to what attracted you into teaching. Your answer will be unique to you and it will provide plenty of insight into why you have made the choices you have. You can also show passion for teaching and link in your career aspirations if you’re an NQT.   Why did you choose to teach this particular age range? Again, this answer will be unique to you and is an opportunity for you to detail why you prefer to work with specific year groups, or why you differentiate between primary and secondary school teaching. You may want to talk about the rewarding nature of the work and the ability to deliver various different outcomes.   Why do you want to work at our school? Showcase your research and highlight what makes the particular school standout from others – be it achievements, its ethos or other factors. Know key information around results, the school’s reputation, its catchment area and anything else you think is relevant.   How would you work with a teaching assistant in your classroom? Discuss how you can work with others and highlight the need for collaborative working in the classroom. Show how you would integrate a teaching assistant into your lesson plans and to what degree you would rely on them for assistance. This will vary by teacher and by the lessons being delivered, so you should showcase flexible approaches to teaching where possible.   How will you manage challenges at work? Teaching brings with it numerous challenges and the interviewer will want to see that you recognise that. Refer to instances from your time in teacher training or during your NQT year and detail how you overcome them. Did you struggle to balance lesson planning with a full teaching caseload? If so, talk about it. Or if you’ve had additional responsibilities in past roles that required more time than anticipated, discuss how you found a solution.   What are the core skills and qualities that pupils look for in teachers? This question should enable you to showcase your teaching style and to explain how you feel it fits in a classroom environment. Recognise that different styles exist and showcase the positive aspects – including your drive, passion for teaching, patience, sense of humour and ability to communicate – that are associated with your particular way of doing things.   What qualities do you have which would make you an effective teacher? Take this opportunity to assess the role you are applying for and to relate your skills to the key requirements of the role. Aspects such as patience and flexibility could be considered, alongside how a role can be rewarding. Think about the means of creating and delivering lesson plans and of the need to adapt to different situations as they arise.   Describe a good lesson Look to mention the importance of preparation and refer back to successful lessons you have taught in the past. What worked well and what didn’t, and discuss how the experience enabled you to shape your teaching style as a result. This is a chance to show that you analyse your lessons on a regular basis and that you can pick out strengths and weaknesses to work on and develop.   Describe the teaching method you find most effective Showcase the need for flexibility and that different teaching styles can be required in different situations. Although you will likely have a predominant style that you prefer, it’s an opportunity to highlight how you can use various approaches as you see fit. You may also want to discuss why you feel some methods are more effective than others in those situations.   How would you deal with a pupil who is not co-operating? This is an opportunity to discuss behaviour management strategies and to talk about what works for you in detail. Refer to previous experiences and talk about situations where you were able to bring a difficult, or potentially difficult, situation under control. It’s likely you’ll have plenty of examples, so you can showcase how your approaches have the desired results.   Show examples of how you have achieved each of the Teaching Standards Highlight your knowledge of the Teaching Standards and remember that they represent the bare minimum of what is expected. Look to showcase examples where you excel and approach each standard individually when answering. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

Marking Child Safety Week in your classroom

Child safety is a huge part of school and everyday life, which is why Child Safety Week seeks to put an emphasis on being careful in all everyday environments. Run by the Child Accident Prevention Trust, the theme for 2019 is ‘Family life today: where’s the risk?’, which aims to help children to identify risk around them. Taking place from 3-9 June 2019, there is a focus on teaching youngsters about the potential dangers that exist when they’re at home, or out and about, in the hope that raising awareness will help to reduce the number of accidents that occur. Teachers have a pivotal role to play in raising awareness of everyday risks and there an array of activities that can promote safety in a fun and engaging way. Identifying risks Given the nature of modern family life, there is an abundance of risks that many people, both young and old, may not even consider. For instance, button batteries can be easily swallowed and washing capsules can also be deadly if they end up in the wrong hands. It’s also important to identify and recognise risks when outdoors, such as by being distracted when using a mobile device near busy roads. Child Safety Week, therefore, provides an opportunity to debate the importance of safety and for teachers to discuss the risks that pupils may face. What to think about Pupils should be asked for their perceptions of risk too, as they may not necessarily think that something is a danger when it could be. Perhaps pupils could be quizzed on the risks that they face when making the journey to school, or there is an abundance of fun online tools that youngsters can use to spot everyday dangers. A wide range of resources is also available on the Child Accident Prevention Trust’s website to support teachers and parents ahead of Child Safety Week. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including: Primary teacher jobs Secondary teacher jobs SEN teacher jobs Teaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly.

NGA urges teachers to take on governance roles in other schools

Primary teachers and secondary teachers can enhance their professional development by taking on governor roles in other schools, according to the National Governance Association. In conjunction with Inspiring Governance, the NGA is looking to encourage more school staff to look at roles on the boards of academy trusts and additional schools. Doing so can provide “enormous professional development benefits” it is claimed, as teachers are exposed to strategic leadership, finance and other resource issues. Education secretary Damian Hinds has regularly called for more professionals to provide their skills and experience to enhance the education system by joining school boards. Meanwhile, the government has committed to doubling a £3 million funding pot for governor training and development, which will be available until 2021. The National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT), the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), the Independent Schools Council, Teach First and the Ambition Institute have all backed the NGA campaign. This comes in spite of recognition that such moves into governance will increase the workload for teachers, as it is suggested that the personal development benefits make it worthwhile. NGA chief executive Emma Knights said that governing boards need the “right people around the table”, which means finding people with adequate knowledge and expertise. “Boards, as the employer, can create a culture that enables staff in their school to go out and govern – they can bring back practice from other contexts and will have an understanding of what a governing board does,” she explained. She added that staff will also have experience of strategic leadership and said that staff at all levels should “consider whether governing is for them”. The government is encouraging any individual that may want to consider governance to register with Inspiring Governance, a free service that links volunteers with schools looking to fill positions. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly. 

Celebrating International Museum’s Day in the classroom

Museums can play a pivotal role in education, providing young people with a means of exploring different cultures and history. Since 1977, the International Council of Museums (ICOM) has promoted International Museum’s Day annually, on or around 18th May. In 2018, more than 37,000 museums across the world took part, representing 158 countries and territories around the world. ICOM states that International Museum Day is designed to raise awareness of the role that museums play, by showing that they are “an important means of cultural exchange, enrichment of cultures and development of mutual understanding, cooperation and peace among peoples”. What role do museums have to play?The theme for this year seeks to recognise the role of Museums as cultural hubs and that their role in society is changing. Part of the change has seen museum spaces become more interactive, community orientated and creative, helping to promote the sharing of knowledge and data. Museums also play a vital role in collecting and conserving objects, assisting with research and tackling contemporary social issues and conflict. These institutions have a pivotal role to play in supporting the curriculum and in developing knowledge among school children on many of the major subjects. Museum exhibitions can help to enhance understanding and familiarity with the subject matter, especially for primary school pupils, as it can help bring the topics to life. Using International Museum Day to promote the curriculum International Museum Day, therefore, provides teachers with a chance to promote museums to their pupils and to encourage them to visit when they can. Use the day to encourage debate around the role that museums have, to discuss how their offering is changing, and to look into how collections can promote out-of-the-box thinking. Alternatively, and where budgets allow, teachers may want to consider a school trip to a museum or to see if a museum can provide resources to help enhance time in the classroom. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly. 

Learning at Work Week: Putting L&D at the forefront of teaching

Learning and development are viewed as an essential part of teaching and it forms one of the foundations of Learning at Work Week. The annual event puts an emphasis on learning cultures in the workplace and focuses on how staff at all levels of organisations can work to better themselves. Celebrated from 13th -19th May this year, the theme for Learning at Work Week 2019 is ‘Shaping the Future’ – asking staff to ensure that they have the necessary tools in place so that continual learning and development is possible. Coordinated by the Campaign for Learning, the week also wants to explore how individuals can be more open and resilient to change. This is especially important for teachers and other support staff at a time when the education system is experiencing reform, financial pressures and greater demand as a result of rising pupil numbers. The week provides a great opportunity for head teachers and school boards to promote organisational change and pathways for learning, as well as a range of other benefits. By embracing the topics related to Learning at Work Week, school staff may be able to alter their culture for better outcomes – some of which may include the following:Changing attitudes to learning and workIncreasing awareness of learning and development opportunitiesDevelop learning opportunities in line with wider school goalsEnhanced feedback to support further learning and developmentOpenings to spot and reorganise internal talentValuing different methods and ways of workingIncreasing knowledge and awareness of teacher support toolsTackling departmental or year-group silo working to promote collaboration Campaign for Learning has outlined a number of activities that relate to three key strands – ‘future open’, ‘future ready’ and ‘future active’, details of which can be found here. They have also published a set of ideas and tips for creating an effective Learning at Work event, which includes many of the key topics that should be considered and discussed. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly. 

Promoting the crucial role of National Children’s Day in the classroom

National Children’s Day UK recognises the importance of a healthy childhood and celebrates great initiatives and projects that help children to succeed. Since launching in 2014, the day has grown year-on-year and more organisations, schools, community groups and charities are taking part. In 2019, National Children’s Day UK is on Sunday 12 May, and while it cannot be celebrated in the classroom on the day itself, teachers can still promote the key messages associated with it. The date differs from the United Nations nominated day – 20 November – as National Children’s Day UK wants to encourage children to be outside in their neighbourhoods and surrounded by nature and a day in early summer was chosen as a result. They claim the day is increasingly important as happy and healthy children can have a huge influence on society at a time when issues around obesity and mental health are prevalent. For instance, National Children’s Day UK highlights that one in eight children under 19 has voiced mental health concerns, while around two million children in England live in families with substantial and complex needs. There is, therefore, a need to put an emphasis on children’s health and wellbeing and to celebrate all that is great about growing up. Ideas and inspiration for teachersNational Children’s Day UK has a wide range of guidance on how to get involved, from ideas around creativity and imagination to others around, science, physical activity, music, theatre, dance and the great outdoors. All of the ideas promote fun and freedom of expression and showcase how there are few limits on how schools, teachers and pupils can take part. The performing arts can help to boost confidence and support children to express themselves, while physical activity can positively impact their physical and mental health. Meanwhile, both primary teachers and secondary teachers can promote reading and the arts, as they can enhance a child’s creativity and imagination, while science and developments within it will have a huge impact on future generations. Even an action as simple as promoting the importance of these topics should have positive results, both in and out of the classroom. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly. 

How to get your class walking for National Walking Month

May is National Walking Month in the UK and teachers can play a pivotal role in helping children to feel energised and empowered when it comes to walking. The month, developed by the charity Living Streets, is working to make walking to school the natural choice for parents and children alike. To mark their 90th anniversary, the charity is putting a focus on health and wellbeing this year, in order to showcase how walking can help the whole community, as well as individuals. The charity has one major ambition, and that is for every child that can walk to school to do so. It comes as they seek to address a sharp decline in the amount that young people walk – whereas 70% of people walked to school just one generation ago, now it’s less than half. Why walking makes a differenceWalking to school brings with it a number of benefits for young people, and Living Streets highlights this as part of Walking to School Week, marked on 20-24 May this year. As well as walking challenges and fun tasks that raise awareness, it also helps to showcase the other benefits, including: Reduced congestion: Fewer cars on the roads at peak times helps to boost health. At peak times, one in five cars in on the school run, contributing to congestion, carbon emissions and air pollution.Cleaner air: A mind-boggling two million tonnes of carbon dioxide is generated annually by those on the school run. Cutting that figure will help enhance the environment and the air we all breathe.Happier children: Studies have focused on the impact of walking and exercise, and have revealed that children who have some form of exercise before school, such as walking, perform better in class as they are refreshed and ready to learn. Living Streets has a number of resources that can assist teachers who want to push the walking to school message as part of National Walking Month. The aim is to help children benefit first-hand the benefits of walking to school and there are packs for those in both primary and secondary school teaching jobs. Tradewind Recruitment are an education recruitment specialist and with 11 offices across the UK, we have tons of fantastic temporary / supply, long-term and permanent jobs in primary, secondary and SEN schools, including:Primary teacher jobsSecondary teacher jobsSEN teacher jobsTeaching Assistant jobs Interested in applying? You can view all of our jobs here or alternatively you can submit your CV - your local education recruitment consultant will get in touch with you shortly. 

27 Posts found